Ozone-rich air descends from on high

Ozone in the stratosphere usually stays up there and protects us from UV rays but sometimes the gas enters the lower part of earth’s atmosphere, affecting ground-level ozone and human health.

Ozone in the stratosphere usually stays up there and protects us from UV rays but sometimes the gas enters the lower part of earth’s atmosphere, affecting ground-level ozone and human health.

Enjoy and share….

The Star-Forming Region Sharpless 2-106

This is a stunning star-forming region known as Sharpless 2-106. It is located in the constellation Cygnus the Swan some 2,000 light years from Earth.
The wings of this emission nebula are bubbles of hot gas created by strong stellar winds and high energy radiation coming from a massive, hot, newborn star in the center.
The central star is very large, some 15 times more massive than our Sun. Two jets of matter streaming from its poles heat the surrounding gas and dust to ten thousand degrees Celsius.
Dust that is not ionized by the stellar jets reflect the light from the star which is ejecting material at roughly 100 km/s.

Enjoy and share…..

The Untold Story Of The World’s Most Famous Photo

I’m sure you’ve seen one of the world’s most famous photographs, “Earthrise.” It’s been on the cover of TIME and on stamps. But did you know it almost didn’t happen? This occurred 45 years ago, Christmas Eve, 1968. Here is the untold story of this iconic shot!

In December of 1968, the crew of Apollo 8 became the first people to leave our home planet and travel to another body in space. But as crew members Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders all later recalled, the most important thing they discovered was Earth.
Using photo mosaics and elevation data from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), this video commemorates the 45th anniversary of Apollo 8′s historic flight by recreating the moment when the crew first saw and photographed the Earth rising from behind the Moon. Narrator Andrew Chaikin, author of A Man on the Moon, sets the scene for a three-minute visualization of the view from both inside and outside the spacecraft accompanied by the onboard audio of the astronauts.
The visualization draws on numerous historical sources, including the actual cloud pattern on Earth from the ESSA-7 satellite and dozens of photographs taken by Apollo 8, and it reveals new, historically significant information about the Earthrise photographs. It has not been widely known, for example, that the spacecraft was rolling when the photos were taken, and that it was this roll that brought the Earth into view. The visualization establishes the precise timing of the roll and, for the first time ever, identifies which window each photograph was taken from.
The key to the new work is a set of vertical stereo photographs taken by a camera mounted in the Command Module’s rendezvous window and pointing straight down onto the lunar surface. It automatically photographed the surface every 20 seconds. By registering each photograph to a model of the terrain based on LRO data, the orientation of the spacecraft can be precisely determined.

Enjoy and share…..

On February 5, 1971, Edgar Mitchell jumped off the last rungs of a ladder connecting him to NASA’s Antares spacecraft and landed with two feet on the Moon. Following the disastrous Apollo 13 mission, Mitchell was one of three astronauts to successfully complete the Apollo 14 journey to the Moon, though it wasn’t without its own alarming moments. In Earthrise, Edgar recalls his spectacular trip to the Moon and the life experiences that got him there, including his early days spent in Roswell, New Mexico, amid nuclear testing and the rumored UFO crash; his first solo airplane flight as a young teen; his time as a navy combat pilot; and becoming a NASA astronaut.

Earthrise: My Adventures as an Apollo 14 Astronaut
Earthrise: My Adventures as an Apollo 14 Astronaut
Old Price: $19.95
Price: $9.94