Space Communications Networks Support MMS

Since its inception MMS has made news. On March 12, 2015 it was finally launched.
All three of NASA’s Space Communications Networks are excited to support the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission in its journey to study the micro-physics of magnetic reconnection. The Near Earth, Space and Deep Space Networks will support MMS through it commissioning phase and eventual science mission.

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Celestron 21041 60mm PowerSeeker Telescope
Celestron 21041 60mm PowerSeeker Telescope
Old Price: $69.95
Price: $54.43

New Craters on the Moon

In this video we find out some of the results achieved since 2009, when the LRO arrived at the Moon.
As we have had a lot of Lunar activities lately, this is a good time to learn a little bit more about it.
Planetary scientists believe that small impacts regularly bombard the Moon, but until recently, they’ve had no way to distinguish new craters from the already pockmarked lunar surface. In 2009, NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) arrived at the Moon and began taking high-resolution photographs. By comparing pictures taken early in the mission with more recent images, the LRO camera team at Arizona State University has discovered more than two-dozen new impact craters – including an 18-meter-wide crater caused by a bright flash on March 17, 2013.

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Celestron 31042 AstroMaster 114 EQ Reflector Telescope
Celestron 31042 AstroMaster 114 EQ Reflector Telescope
Price: $249.95

Hubble Meets James Webb

In this longer than usual video Dr. J tells us all about the 2 giants of the sky.
A cosmic double act.
How did the Solar System form?
What was the Universe like when it was very young?
What are planets around other stars like?
Over the last 25 years, Hubble has provided answers for these and many other questions. However, even the best of telescopes needs a
colleague…and that’s where the James Webb Space Telescope comes in.
Over the past 25 years, Hubble has proved to be on the most successful scientific instruments ever devised.
From its vantage point, high above the Earth’s atmosphere, it has made
many discoveries.
Among its achievements, is an accurate measurement of the age of the Universe.
It has also played a key role in the discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating.
It has analyzed exoplanets, discovered supermassive black holes, and
watched galaxies grow, collide, and merge.
And that’s just to name a few.
As Hubble enters its 25th year in orbit, with celebrations planned around the world for its anniversary on 24 April 2015, this Hubblecast celebrates the relationship that the telescope will have with its future colleague, the James Webb Space Telescope.
So, what are some of the differences between Hubble and James Webb?
Well, first of all, James Webb is incredibly big for a space telescope.
While Hubble’s 2.4­metre mirror is already quite large, it is simply
dwarfed by James Webb’s 6.5­metre mirror.
James Webb stand a much better chance of detecting the faint light
from the first galaxies..
Another difference is that Hubble was designed to be visited by
astronauts for a service once in a while, swapping out instruments and faulty components. This will not be possible for James Webb. Once it’slaunched, it will have to fend for itself.

The reason for the different design is that James Webb will look at a
different kind of light compared to Hubble.
While Hubble can see ultraviolet, visible, and some infrared light,
James Webb is specialized for the infrared, and that means it has to be
a cold telescope — a very cold telescope.
In fact, James Webb will have to operate at something like minus 230
degrees Celsius — just about 40 degrees above absolute zero.
The reason is that warm objects emit infrared heat radiation. So, if you
want you your infrared telescope to be exceptionally sensitive, you
have to cool it down to very low temperatures. Otherwise, it will simply
blind itself with its own heat radiation.Because it has to operate at incredibly cold temperatures, James
Webb can’t be built in the same way as Hubble. In particular, it has to
carry its own huge sun-shield to keep the telescope cool. The telescope
and the sun-shield are so big that James Webb will have to unpack itself
once launched.
It is a great feat of engineering, as everything for the telescope has to
be built at room temperature, but still needs to be aligned and working
properly when it is cooled down — which changes the size of the
components inside.. Keeping James Webb cold is the reason behind another big
difference between it and Hubble. Whilst Hubble orbits the Earth at
around five hundred kilometres, James Webb has a very different path
— not in orbit of the Earth — that will keep it one and a half million
kilometres from Earth.. And astronomers have an additional bonus to look forward to —
when James Webb is launched, Hubble will still be active. So, for some
period of time, astronomers will be able to use both telescopes to
explore the cosmos. Who knows what they will find?

Enjoy and share….

Celestron 21041 60mm PowerSeeker Telescope
Celestron 21041 60mm PowerSeeker Telescope
Old Price: $69.95
Price: $54.43